FAQs

1. How do I declare statistics as my major?
2. How do I add statistics as my second major?
3. I am interested in becoming an actuary. Is there a degree in actuarial science at UC Davis?
4. How do the recent changes in the statistics major options and course requirements affect me?
5. I am interested in the Applied Statistics option, can you tell me more about the five non-statistics electives?
6. Am I required to take MAT 21D?
7. How do I petition for a modification to the statistics major course requirements?
8. How do I choose and get approval of an elective course to be used to fulfill the statistics major requirement?
9. I am considering graduate school in statistics, which statistics program option should I choose?
10. How do I know if a course at another institution is equivalent to a statistics course at UC Davis?
11. How do I earn academic credits for special study, independent study, or internship in statistics?
12. How do I know if I have completed all the coursework required of my major and therefore I am eligible to receive my degree in statistics?
13. How do I know if I have met all graduation requirments for a Bachelor's degree?
14. How can I find internship or employment opportunities?


1. How do I declare statistics as my major?

You can declare a statistics major at any time after your first quarter. However, it is recommended that you have taken some of the preparatory courses prior to declaring. Meet with the major advisor to discuss your interest and submit Change of Major to the Dean’s office of College of Letters and Science to be officially declared as a statistics major.

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2. How do I add Statistics as my second major?

Submit Change of Major and Multiple Major Program forms to the L&S Dean’s Office to be considered as a double major. At the time of petition, two upper division courses in each major must have been successfully completed. Also, for each major, 80% of the upper-division units must be unique; this usually translates into 2-3 overlapping courses between the two majors.

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3. I am interested in becoming an actuary. Is there a degree in actuarial science at UC Davis?

At UC Davis, we don’t offer a program in actuarial science; very few institutions confer such a degree. But having an educational background in statistics, mathematics, or economics provides good preparation for the actuarial profession. Your curriculum should include calculus, linear algebra, probability and statistics, computer science, and economics. For more information, please visit Preparing for an Actuarial Career While in College.

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4. How do the recent changes in the statistics major options and course requirements affect me?

The Department of Statistics has recently revised its undergraduate program. Mainly, a new option, Applied Statistics, is added to the B.S. in Statistics major. Also, some small changes are made in the General Option and the Computational Statistics Option to reflect prerequsites changes and to streamline upper-division math and computer science enginering courses relevant to statistics. All of these changes became effective Fall Quarter 08. The A.B. in Statistics degree option is still in effect. If you declared as a statistics major prior to Fall 08, you can opt to switch to the new requirements or stay with the old requirements. If you declared during or after Fall 08, the new requirements will apply.

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5. I am interested in the Applied Statistics option, can you tell me more about the five non-statistics electives?

Students choosing the Applied Statistics option are required to take five upper-division electives to which statistical models and methods are applied. These courses should be located in one single subject area rather than a random cluster of courses across multiple disciplines. At least three of the five electives should cover the quantitative aspects of the chosen discipline. The five electives must be chosen and approved by the major advisor. The primary areas of applications of statistics from which the electives can be chosen are economics/manegerial economics, biological sciences, human devleopment/education, engineering, psychology and sociology. Please consult with the major advisor for a list of recommended courses.  

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6. Am I required to take MAT 21D?

The Math Department recently reconfigured the MAT 21 calculus series. MAT 21D was officially added to the series Fall 2006. If you started taking the 21 series during or after Fall 2006, you are strongly recommended to take MAT 21D in order to be adequately prepared for STA 131 series. MAT 21D has been officially added as a preparatory course for the statistics major in the 2008-09/2009-10 General Catalog.

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7. How do I petition for a modification to the statistics major course requirements?

We recognize that various reasons, such as course offerings and graduation plan, may affect a student’s normal progression in the program. You may petition to the faculty advisor for a modification to the major course requirements provided that you have a compelling reason. Please fill out Major Modification Petition. If your petition is approved, return the signed form to the department for proper documentation.

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8. How do I choose and get approval of an elective course to be used to fulfill the statistics major requirement?

The elective must be an upper-division course that covers the quantitative aspects of a discipline. For the A.B. degree in Statistics, all three electives must be in one discipline such as economics, biological science, human development, and etc. You may contact us for recommended electives or propose a course for us to review. All electives need to be approved by the major advisor and documented on Proposed Major Study Plan if they are to be used to fulfill the statistics major course requirements.

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9. I am considering graduate school in Statistics, which statistics program option should I choose?

The B.S. (general option) is recommended; and you are particularly recommended to take the MAT 25, 125A-B series. This option combines the study of statistics and mathematics, which provides more advanced theoretical grounding for graduate study in Statistics. However, if your graduate school focus is in other fields, the A.B or the B.S. (computer science) degree is no less sufficient.

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10. How do I know if a course at another institution is equivalent to a statistics course at UC Davis?

ASSIST is a comprehensive on-line course articulation system for most California community colleges with University of California. Search ASSIST to see if a lower-division course at a California community college is equivalent to a course at UC Davis.


If you plan to take a statistics course at another UC campus, private institutions, or out-of-state institutions, please provide us with an expanded course description, including the textbooks to be used, prerequisites, topics to be covered, and other pertinent information about the course for review and approval.

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11. How do I earn academic credits for special study, independent study, or internship in statistics?

Students who wish to enroll in STA 99X, 98, 99, 190X, 192, 194HA-194HB, 198, 199 must first identify and contact a faculty person whose academic expertise is related to their proposed project. If the faculty person agrees to sponsor the student’s research or special study project, the student and the faculty sponsor together fill out a Course Contract. The course contracts are agreements between faculty and students and serve as written verification of the faculty person’s consent to sponsor the student for academic unit credit.

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12. How do I know if I have completed all the coursework required of my major and therefore I am eligible to receive my degree in Statistics?

All statistics graduating seniors are required to complete and turn in a major certification form at the beginning of the quarter they plan to graduate. Please complete the appropriate degree certification form and consult with the major advisor if you have any questions. Return the completed form to the undergraduate program coordinator promptly so that the department can verify your status toward degree attainment. Please note that any unresolved or unapproved coursework may jeopardize your graduation schedule.

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13. How do I know if I have met all graduation requirements for a Bachelor's degree?

To be eligible for graduation, an undergraduate student must meet all university, college, and major, and minor (if applicable) requirements. For major requirements, please consult with a major advisor from the department that offers the program. For completion of the university and college requirements please do a degree check with a counselor at the dean's office of your college. For students in the College of Letters and Science you can start with Graduation Requirement Self-Check. For Statistics students, if you are doing the A.B. degree option, be sure you complete the foreign language and A.B. breadth requirement. If you are doing the B.S. in Statistics, be sure you complete 90 units in Natural Science and Mathematics as the B.S. breadth requirement. Please note if your electives in the Applied Statistics are in economics or social-science related disciplines, you may need to take more science classes to fulfill the B.S. breadth requirement. For the list of approvd courses in Natural Science and Mathematics please see page 105-106 of the  UC Davis General Catalog. For additional advice please consult with a counselor at the Dean's Office. 

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14. How can I find internship or employment opportunities?

The Internship and Career Center would be your first resource on campus. Register at their website to receive updates about job listings, upcoming career fairs, and recruitment fairs. You can also schedule an appointment to meet a career counselor to explore your career options. Broaden your internship and job search by focusing on the skills and qualifications the companies and organizations are looking for, rather than the specific job titles. Network with your peers and professors in the department - you would be surprised at the great insights you may gain from these relationships.

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